Arsenic

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Attribution: Tomihahndorf

Animated Arsenic

History

From the Latin word arsenicum, Greek arsenikon. Elemental arsenic occurs in two solid modifications: yellow, and gray or metallic, with specific gravities of 1.97, and 5.73, respectively. It is believed that Albertus Magnus obtained the element in 1250 A.D. In 1649 Schroeder published two methods of preparing the element. Mispickel arsenopyrite, (FeSAs), is the most common mineral from which, on heating, the arsenic sublimes leaving ferrous sulfide.

Uses

Arsenic is used in bronzing, pyrotechny, and for hardening and improving the sphericity of shot. The most important compounds are white arsenic, the sulfide, Paris green, calcium arsenate, and lead arsenate; the last three have been used as agricultural insecticides and poisons. Marsh's test makes use of the formation and ready decomposition of arsine. Arsenic is finding increasing uses as a doping agent in solid-state devices such as transistors. Gallium arsenide is used as a laser material to convert electricity directly into coherent light.

General Info

AtomicNumber
33
Symbol
As
Name
Arsenic

Atomic Info

Appearance
AtomicWeight
74.92160(2)
Color
BD80E3
ElectronicConfiguration
[Ar] 3d10 4s2 4p3
ElectronegativityInPauling
2.18
AtomicRadiusInPM
119
IonRadiusInPM
58 (+3)
VanDerWaalsRadiusInPM
185
IEinKJmol
947
EAinKJmol
-78
OxidationStates
-3, 2, 3, 5
StandardState
solid
BondingType
metallic
MeltingPoint
1090
BoilingPoint
887
Density
5.73
State
Metalloid
DiscoveredYear
Ancient