Praseodymium

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Animated Praseodymium

History

From the Greek word prasios, green, and didymos, twin. In 1841 Mosander extracted the rare earth didymia from lanthana; in 1879, Lecoq de Boisbaudran isolated a new earth, samaria, from didymia obtained from the mineral samarskite. Six years later, in 1885, von Welsbach separated didymia into two others, praseodymia and neodymia, which gave salts of different colors. As with other rare earths, compounds of these elements in solution have distinctive sharp spectral absorption bands or lines, some of which are only a few Angstroms wide.

Sources

The element occurs along with other rare-earth elements in a variety of minerals. Monazite and bastnasite are the two principal commercial sources of the rare-earth metals. It was prepared in relatively pure form in 1931.

Uses

Misch metal, used in making cigarette lighters, contains about 5% praseodymium metal. The rare-earth oxides, including Pr2O3 are among the most refractory substances known. Along with other rare earths, it is widely used as a core material for carbon arcs used by the motion picture industry for studio lighting and projection. Salts of praseodymium are used to color glasses and enamels; when mixed with certain other materials, praseodymium produces an intense and unusually clean yellow color in glass. Didymium glass, of which praseodymium is a component, is a colorant for welders goggles.

General Info

AtomicNumber
59
Symbol
Pr
Name
Praseodymium

Atomic Info

Appearance
AtomicWeight
140.90765(2)
Color
D9FFC7
ElectronicConfiguration
[Xe] 4f3 6s2
ElectronegativityInPauling
1.13
AtomicRadiusInPM
IonRadiusInPM
99 (+3)
VanDerWaalsRadiusInPM
IEinKJmol
527
EAinKJmol
-50
OxidationStates
2, 3, 4
StandardState
solid
BondingType
metallic
MeltingPoint
1204
BoilingPoint
3563
Density
6.64
State
Lanthanide
DiscoveredYear
1885