Tellurium

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Attribution: images-of-elements.com

Animated Tellurium

History

From the Latin word tellus, earth. Discovered by Muller von Reichenstein in 1782; named by Klaproth, who isolated it in 1798.

Sources

Tellurium is occasionally found native, but is more often found as the telluride of gold (calaverite), and combined with other metals. It is recovered commercially from anode muds produced during the electrolytic refining of blister copper. The U.S., Canada, Peru, and Japan are the largest Free World producers of the element.

Uses

Tellurium improves the machinability of copper and stainless steel, and its addition to lead decreases the corrosive action of sulfuric acid on lead and improves its strength and hardness. Tellurium is used as a basic ingredient in blasting caps, and is added to cast iron for chill control. Tellurium is used in ceramics. Bismuth telluride has been used in thermoelectric devices.

Isotopes

Thirty isotopes of tellurium are known, with atomic masses ranging from 108 to 137. Natural tellurium consists of eight isotopes.

General Info

AtomicNumber
52
Symbol
Te
Name
Tellurium

Atomic Info

Appearance
AtomicWeight
127.60(3)
Color
D47A00
ElectronicConfiguration
[Kr] 4d10 5s2 5p4
ElectronegativityInPauling
2.1
AtomicRadiusInPM
135
IonRadiusInPM
221 (-2)
VanDerWaalsRadiusInPM
206
IEinKJmol
869
EAinKJmol
-190
OxidationStates
-2, 2, 4, 5, 6
StandardState
solid
BondingType
metallic
MeltingPoint
723
BoilingPoint
1261
Density
6.24
State
Metalloid
DiscoveredYear
1782